Lily Mae Avant
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Brain Eating Amoeba: Lily Mae Avant Wiki, Bio, Facebook, brazos river

Lily Mae Avant Wiki

Lily Mae Avant: A 10-year-old girl From Texas died Monday after contracting a rare, brain-eating amoeba during a weekend swimming trip. Lily Avant was swimming in the Brazos River — near her home of Whitney, Texas — over Labor Day weekend when she likely contracted the amoeba.


She began suffering from symptoms, such as fever and headaches, a few days later, according to a Facebook post by her cousin, Wendy Scott.

Lily Mae Avant Brain-Eating Amoeba

Lily Mae Avant swam in a river and lake over the Labor Day holiday weekend earlier in September, then suffered a headache and a fever the following weekend.

Her health quickly deteriorated, and she was taken to a local hospital, then transferred to Cook Children’s Hospital in Fort Worth. Her fight for life attracted support from across the United States and around the world.

The family said in a statement on Facebook that Lily Mae was “in the arms of Jesus”.

What is Brain-Eating Amoeba?

The amoeba can infect the brain when someone gets untreated water in their nose, usually during swimming or other water recreation. The amoeba is very common in natural, unchlorinated bodied across the U.S., but it is extremely rare.

Lily Mae Avant School

Valley Mills Elementary School, where Lily was a fifth-grader, confirmed her death Monday on Facebook, saying the school district “is deeply saddened by the loss of Lily Mae Avant. Lily was an absolute blessing to our elementary school. She was an outstanding student, but more importantly, Lily was an incredible person and friend to all.”
“She has and will continue to touch lives around the nation,” the school wrote.

Tribute To Lily Mae Avant By Valley Mills Elementary- Valley Mills, Texas

Valley Mills Independent School District is deeply saddened by the loss of Lily Mae Avant. Lily Mae Avantwas an absolute blessing to our elementary school. She was an outstanding student, but more importantly, Lily was an incredible person and friend to all. She was loving, kind, respectful, and had a beautiful heart. This campus and community are beyond blessed for the time we shared with our Lily. Now through Lily’s strength and resiliency, the world has had an opportunity to see how beautiful and special she was. She has and will continue to touch lives around the nation. We continue to think about and pray for Lily’s family who has shown great faith and strength throughout this time. The family’s courage, strength, and unwavering faith is a true inspiration to not only our community but to all who have been following Lily’s story.

We are doing everything we can to provide comfort and assistance to the family, and to our students and staff, in this time of grief. Valley Mills ISD is a close-knit group, so this loss will impact many. We will have grief counselors available on campus for the remainder of the week for students and staff. We will share additional ways to support the family and service details as they become available.

We are, and we will always be Lily Strong.

Texas Department About “brain-eating amoeba.”

The Texas Department of State Health Services confirmed that a Bosque County resident contracted PAM, primary amebic meningoencephalitis. PAM is caused by naegleria fowleri, commonly referred to as a “brain-eating amoeba.” According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the disease is almost always fatal.

Lily Mae Avant Video

To reduce the risk of swimming in natural bodies of water, here are some tips:

• Avoid water-related activities in bodies of warm freshwater during periods of high water temperature and low water levels.

• Hold the nose shut or use nose clips when taking part in water-related activities in bodies of warm freshwater such as lakes, rivers, or hot springs.
• Avoid putting your head under the water in hot springs and other untreated thermal waters.
• Avoid digging in or stirring up the sediment while taking part in water-related activities in shallow, warm, freshwater areas.
• Use only sterile, distilled, or lukewarm previously boiled water for nasal irrigation or sinus flushes (e.g., Neti Pot usage, ritual nasal ablution, etc.).

This story was originally published by Lisette Lopez on KXXV.

 

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