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Who is Stacey Officer Karen? Wiki, Bio, Age, Viral Video, Family, Career, Net Worth, Many More Facts You Need To Know

Stacey Officer Karen
Stacey Officer Karen

Stacey Officer Karen Wiki – Stacey Officer Karen Biography

Georgia cop named as Stacey went viral on June 17 after a video emerged showing her upset over her McDonald’s breakfast order. It is unclear from the video what law enforcement agency Stacey is with.

Stacey is a cop called “Officer Karen” by the internet after talking about McDonald’s experiences about trying to make her breakfast viral. A Twitter user named Ann shared the video on Twitter: “For 15 years, Stacey, who has been a cop, paid McDonald’s in advance and was treated as a police officer. Come on America. We are better than that. ”

Stacey Officer Karen Video

In the video, Stacey identifies the McDonald’s restaurant in question as part of Love’s Travel Stop, located on 8436 Ford Ave in Richmond Hill, Georgia. Franchise Georgia is located on the outskirts of Savannah.

Stacey is a cop called “Officer Karen” by the internet after talking about McDonald’s experiences about trying to make her breakfast viral.

In the video, the police officer identified as Stacey talks about a trip to McDonald for breakfast. “I decided to come to McDonald… and waited to get my food, I already made my mobile order, so people don’t pay my stuff because I like to pay for myself. But when I pull it to the window, I go home from work, they give me my receipt so I go to the second window to get my food. ”

“And I’m waiting, and I’m waiting, and I’m waiting, and so the girl comes to the window and asks me what my order was. I repeat my order, and they ask me to pull up because my food’s not ready. It’s an English muffin meal with a hash brown and coffee.”

“And I mean, I hadn’t eaten since probably … like in a while, so I was kind of hungry. And I’m still waiting, and I’m still waiting, and they ask me to pull up. So I pull up and a girl comes out with my coffee and just the coffee. And she hands it to me and I have my window down,” Stacey states as her voice begins to crack.

“And that’s all she hands me is the coffee. So I told her, don’t bother with the food because right now I’m too nervous to take it. It doesn’t matter how many hours I’ve been up, it doesn’t matter what I’ve done for anyone, right now I’m too nervous to take a meal from McDonald’s because I can’t see it being made.”

“I don’t know what’s going on with people nowadays, but please just give us a break, please just give us a break. I don’t know how much more I can take. I’ve been in this for 15 years and I’ve never had such anxiety about waiting for McDonald’s drive-thru food. So just have a heart, and if you see an officer, just tell them to thank you because I don’t hear thank you enough anymore. All I want is my McDonald’s.”

The original video created thousands of comments. Many said it was common practice at McDonald’s to give customers their drinks before their food. One commentator says, “OMG. I can not do. My first job was at McDonald’s. The drink always comes first. Breakfast sandwiches are made in bulk unless the person in the back just makes them bulk, asking for something special. Hashbrowns are fried in the fryer and batches should be made. “
Stacey’s viral video came after allegations by two New York Police Department unions that officers were poisoned by Shake Shack employees in Manhattan on the night of June 15. In early June 16th, NYPD’s Chief of Detectives Rodney Harrison tweeted that there was no “guilt” involved in the illness of the officers. The New York Times reported that officers who felt sick were related to the “faulty cleaning” of a machine.
In the original message, “Tonight, our three duty friends were deliberately poisoned by one or more workers at Shake Shack in 200 Broadway in Manhattan. Fortunately, they were not severely damaged. The messages have been removed from both the Detectives Foundation’s website and the Twitter account of the New York City Police Aid Association.

 

About the author

Darryl Hinton

Originally from the U.K., Darryl Hinton is a journalist and web content specialist who now lives and writes in Trending Topics of United States, United Kingdom and Australia. Hinton's work has appeared in a wide range of publications in print and online, including The Guardian, The Daily Beast, Pacific Standard magazine, The Independent, McSweeney’s Internet Tendency, and many other outlets.

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